Thursday, December 20, 2012

Celebrating the 200th Anniversary of Grimm's Fairy Tales!


Kym Hepworth / Little Red Riding Hood / 2012 / mixed media / 12 3/4 x 21 1/2 x 1 1/2 in. 
©2012 - Kym Hepworth. All Rights Reserved.


“There was once a sweet little maid, much beloved by everybody, but most of all by her grandmother, who never knew how to make enough of her. Once she sent her a little cap of red velvet, and as it was very becoming to her, and she never wore anything else, people called her Little Red Riding Hood. One day her mother said to her,

“Come, Little Red Riding Hood, here are some cakes and a flask of wine for you to take to grandmother; she is weak and ill, and they will do her good. Make haste and start before it grows hot, and walk properly and nicely, and don’t run, or you might fall and break the flask of wine, and there would be none left for grandmother. And when you go into her room, don’t forget to say, Good morning, instead of staring about you. . .”

Wednesday, December 5, 2012

grim fairy tales (Ludmilla Petrushevskaya)

excerpt from the story There's Someone in the House by Ludmilla Petrushevskaya from There Once Lived a Woman Who Tried to Kill Her Neighbor’s Baby: Scary Fairy Tales

*****

Kym Hepworth,  Even Without Music


“The woman watches television until she falls asleep. She watches intently, her face pressed to the screen. She immerses herself in its bluish rays, floats off to foreign worlds, becomes frightened, intrigued, heartbroken -- in short, she lives. This is her place, on the couch. And then -- crash! Something just fell in the bedroom.

This time there was an awful racket. It really collapsed, whatever it was. The sound is still echoing through the apartment.

The woman runs into the room and stands there in shock. The shelf with all her records has collapsed. They’ve scattered all over, spread out in a fanlike formation on the unmade sofa bed and on the floor. If someone -- you get three guesses who -- had been sleeping there, she’d have gotten the sharp corner of the shelf right in the skull. . . .

The shelf now lies on the piano -- that’s why it made such a terrible racket, with echoes like in the mountains.

The piano -- that, too, was an adventure. A little girl tried to learn to play it. Her mother insisted, forced her to sit there and practice. Nothing came of it; stubbornness won out in the end, the stubbornness that protects us from the will of others, that defends our right to live our life the way we want. Even if it means life will turn out worse than anyone planned, will turn into a poor life -- but it’ll be one’s own, however it is, even without music, even without talent. Without concerts for the family, maybe -- but also without needless worries that someone else plays the piano better. The mother always worried that other children were more talented than her daughter. The daughter heard this enough times and had her revenge by becoming a total nonentity, a fact that both mother and daughter freely acknowledged.



Kym Hepworth, there was no mother, no daughter



Then it all dissolved, all those family dramas straight out of Turgenev; now all that remained was the piano and the old records that crashed into it. The mother had collected classical music, once. The mother had spent hours discussing her daughter over the phone, spilling her child’s secrets as if they didn’t cost a thing. Now there was no mother, no daughter, no shelf for the records. Just a woman standing in a doorway, awestruck by the scene of destruction that was her bedroom. There could be no more sleeping on that bed -- everything was ruined, soaked through with dust. She had to change the sheets. She had to wash, clean, find a new place for everything -- but where? There was no room.

The woman retreats to the living room, closing the door to the bedroom as if for the last time.”


(Source for quote: There Once Lived a Woman Who Tried to Kill Her Neighbor’s Baby: Scary Fairy Tales by Ludmilla Petrushevskaya, published by Penguin Books, New York, NY, ©2009
)

*****

Francesca Woodman (1958-1981), I could no longer play, I could not play by instinct, Providence, RI, c. 1977

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Off they go to SCAD's Small Works show!

Robin Miller and I have artwork in Savannah College of Art and Design's Small Works 2012 exhibition! Robin has 15 new collages from his Distinguished Gentlemen Cloaked in Greatness series in Small Works 2012:

Robin Miller / Distinguished Gentlemen Cloaked in Greatness series (original framed collages) / 2012 / mixed media
©2012 - Robin Miller. All Rights Reserved

and my beaded art wreaths & pillows will be in Small Works 2012 too:

Kym Hepworth / (left to right) A Penny For Your Thoughts (Victorian Woman), Sweet Jane, A Penny For Your Thoughts (Cemetery Mourner), Sailor Boy, Wild Rose (Evelyn Nesbit) and A Penny For Your Thoughts (Jane Burden Morris) / 2012 / mixed media
©2012 - Kym Hepworth. All Rights Reserved.

SCAD's Small Works 2012 exhibition runs from November 16th through December 28th, 2012 at Gutstein Gallery, Savannah, GA. The Opening Reception is Friday, November 16th, from 6:00-7:30 pm. If you're in the area, stop by and see the show!

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

when worlds collide (Moore College of Art and Design & Etsy)

Moore! Moore! Moore! is an Etsy treasury that I curated for our shop inthecrystalpalace

This collection highlights talented alumnae of Moore College of Art and Design (Philadelphia, PA) who sell their artwork on Etsy:

Moore! Moore! Moore! curated by Kym Hepworth for inthecrystalpalace
(I'm a Moore alumna - B.F.A. in Painting)

The Moore College of Art and Design alumnae featured in this collection include lauraguzzo, PapillonDreams, thecottonpress, CircusAbandon, and milkshakecrafts. Stop by and visit their Etsy shops! 

Moore College of Art and Design is the first & only visual arts college for women in the United States. It was founded in 1848 by Sarah Worthington Peter as The Philadelphia School of Design for Women.

**-**


Louise Stahl went to Moore to study in the art education department and graduated with a B.F.A. in 1942. She was asked by Harriet Sartain to teach at Moore in the Color Department in 1947. Louise officially retired from Moore in 1997, after teaching there for 50 years (but she taught for seven more years in the Textile Department after retiring).

Monday, July 9, 2012

Strange Encounters: Edgar Allan Poe meets Little Red Riding Hood

Well, things didn't work out EXACTLY the way I planned. It took a little longer than I thought it would - but here's a look at my new Edgar Allan Poe wreath:

Kym Hepworth / Edgar Allan Poe wreath / 2012 / mixed media / 33 x 8 x 1 1/4 in.
©2012 - Kym Hepworth. All Rights Reserved.



 Kym Hepworth / detail, Edgar Allan Poe wreath / 2012
" 'I believe that demons take advantage of the night to mislead the unwary' -- 'although, you know,' he added, 'I don't believe in them.' "
- Edgar Allan Poe (1809 - 1849)

 And, BONUS!!! Here's my new Little Red Riding Hood collage:  

Kym  Hepworth / Little Red Riding Hood / 2012 / mixed media / 12 3/4 x 21 1/2 x 1 1/2 in.
©2012 - Kym Hepworth. All Rights Reserved.
"And when she said, "Good morning," there was no answer. Then she went to the bed and drew back the curtains; there lay the grandmother with her cap pulled over her eyes, so that she looked very odd.
"O grandmother, what large ears you have got!"
"The better to hear with."
"O grandmother, what great eyes you have got!"
"The better to see with."
"O grandmother, what large hands you have got!"
"The better to take hold of you with."
"But, grandmother, what a terrible large mouth you have got!"
"The better to devour you! And no sooner had the wolf said it than he made one bound from the bed, and swallowed up poor Little Red Riding Hood."
 - from Little Red Riding Hood, Grimm's Fairy Tales by Jakob and Wilhelm Grimm

--*-- 
If you'd like to see more, here's a link to our Etsy shop, inthecrystalpalace

Tuesday, June 12, 2012

whatsup?


I'm working on a new Edgar Allan Poe wreath for our Etsy shop, inthecrystalpalace. Hope to have it listed sometime next week. Whatsup with you? 

"Much of Edgar's career, too, may be understood as a sort of prolonged mourning, an artistic brooding-on and assemblage of the fantasies activated by an ever-living past. As no product of his imagination would put to right what had gone wrong or restore what he once possessed, he would begin over and over, repeating in new forms, different imagery, and fresh characters and scenes the dilemma which he presented in his new volume as the peculiar condition of his existence:

I could not love except where Death
Was mingling his with Beauty's breath--"
(excerpt from Edgar A. Poe: Mournful and Never-ending Remembrance by Kenneth Silverman, published by HarperPerennial, New York, NY ©1992)

Sunday, March 25, 2012

Happy Birthday Flannery O'Connor!

Flannery O'Connor was born on March 25, 1925 in Savannah, GA. 

Flannery O'Connor (March 25, 1925 – August 3, 1964)

(photograph © Joe McTyre/Atlanta Constitution. source: Conversations with Flannery O'Connor, edited by Rosemary M. Magee, published by University Press of Mississippi, Jackson, ©1987)


--*--

excerpt from the short story Greenleaf:

“In a few minutes something emerged from the tree line, a black heavy shadow that tossed its head several times and then bounded forward. After a second she saw it was the bull. He was crossing the pasture toward her at a slow gallop, a gay almost rocking gait as if he were overjoyed to find her again. She looked beyond him to see if Mr. Greenleaf was coming out of the woods too but he was not. "Here his is, Mr. Greenleaf!" she called and looked on the other side of the pasture to see if he could be coming out there but he was not in sight. She looked back and saw that the bull, his head lowered, was racing toward her. She remained perfectly still, not in fright, but in a freezing unbelief. She stared at the violent black streak bounding toward her as if she had no sense of distance, as if she could not decide at once what his intention was, and the bull had buried his head in her lap, like a wild tormented lover, before her expression changed. One of his horns sank until it pierced her heart and the other curved around her side and held her in an unbreakable grip. She continued to stare straight ahead but the entire scene in front of her had changed - the tree line was a dark wound in a world that was nothing but sky - and she had the look of a person whose sight has been suddenly restored but who finds the light unbearable.” - Flannery O'Connor

(source for quote: Flannery O'Connor: The Complete Stories, published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux, New York, NY ©1971)

Friday, March 23, 2012

Fact and Fantasy: Beaded Narratives Gallery Talk at Indigo Sky Community Gallery


at Indigo Sky Community Gallery

Looking for something to do in Savannah, GA this weekend? Come to Indigo Sky Community Gallery for a Gallery Talk! The current exhibit is a two-person show, Fact and Fantasy: Beaded Narratives by Nancy Hooten and Kym Hepworth. Tania Sammons, Curator of the Owens-Thomas House and Decorative Arts at the Telfair Museum, has served as curator for this exhibition and will talk about the show on Sunday, March 25th from 3-5 pm. 

If you'd like to read more about the exhibit, here's a link to the article, Beads of light & darkness, by Jim Morekis at Connect Savannah.

Saturday, March 17, 2012

new assemblage: Southern Gothic (Flannery O'Connor)

Kym Hepworth / Southern Gothic (Flannery O'Connor) / 2012 / mixed media / 35 3/4 x 20 5/8 x 4 3/8"
© 2012 - Kym Hepworth. All Rights Reserved. All photographs by Robin Miller.


"Question: Miss O'Connor, you said yesterday that the South was Christ-haunted instead of Christ-centered. I don't quite understand this and how it effects our Southern literature. Would you please explain this?

O'Connor: I shouldn't have said that, should I? Well, as I said, the South didn't seem to me as a writer to be Christ-centered. I don't think anyone would object to that at all. I think all you would have to do is to read the newspapers to agree with me, but I said that we seemed to me to be Christ-haunted and that ghosts cast strange shadows, very fierce shadows, particularly in our literature. It is hard to explain a flat statement like that. I would hate to talk off the top of my head on a subject like that. I think it is a subject that a book could be written about but it would take me ten or twelve years to do it."
(italics mine. source for quote: Conversations with Flannery O'Connor, edited by Rosemary M. Magee, published by University Press of Mississippi, Jackson, MS ©1987)

--*--

Southern Gothic (Flannery O'Connor) was made for a two-person show, Fact and Fantasy: Beaded Narratives by Nancy Hooten and Kym Hepworth at Indigo Sky Community Gallery. Tania Sammons, curator of the Owens-Thomas House and Decorative Arts at the Telfair Museum of Art, is the guest curator of the exhibit. Tania asked Nancy Hooten and me to each create a work inspired by the author Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964). 

detail, Southern Gothic (Flannery O'Connor) / 2012 / mixed media
Detail showing a 19th century tintype of a woman holding an open book.


For my assemblage, I decided to focus on Flannery O'Connor's connection to Savannah. O'Connor was born in Savannah on March 25, 1925 and lived here until 1938. (The Flannery O'Connor Childhood Home is located at 207 East Charlton Street and is one of the few museum houses in the South that is restored to the depression era.) 

detail, Southern Gothic (Flannery O'Connor) / 2012 / mixed media
I sewed together multiple photo transfer images of a house taken from a found photograph. On the top, left corner, someone had written in pencil "where I was born". This is the only panel on the backing board with abbreviated text.

Flannery O'Connor lived most of her life in Milledgeville, GA and was a devout Catholic. She wrote about the South and a central theme in her work is faith, revelation and redemption.


detail, Southern Gothic (Flannery O'Connor) / 2012 / mixed media


detail, Southern Gothic (Flannery O'Connor) / 2012 / mixed media
Detail showing Virgin Mary religious medallion and four-leaf clover. The four-leaf clover refers to Flannery O'Connor's Irish roots. "In Irish tradition the Shamrock or 3-leaf Clover represents the Holy Trinity: one leaf for the Father, one for the Son and one for the Holy Spirit. When a Shamrock is found with the fourth leaf, it represents God's Grace."  (source)

I wanted my assemblage to reflect what was important in O'Connor's life and writing - the South and religion -and to highlight O'Connor's use of dark, macabre, grotesque imagery. 

detail, Southern Gothic (Flannery O'Connor) / 2012 / mixed media
Detail showing a detached, hanging doll arm and a Civil War bullet. My references to the Civil War are extremely understated and include the bullet, blue and gray beadwork, and four Lincoln pennies.

Southern Gothic (Flannery O'Connor) is about being tied to a place and haunted by the past. Through my imagery, I've evoked the ideas of ancestral roots, family trees, home, and inheritance.

detail, Southern Gothic (Flannery O'Connor) / 2012 / mixed media
Detail of roots growing from of the bottom of the memory dress.


detail, Southern Gothic (Flannery O'Connor) / 2012 / mixed media
Detail showing abandoned/haunted house with treeline behind it.

Friday, March 16, 2012

Fact and Fantasy: Beaded Narratives by Nancy Hooten and Kym Hepworth

exhibition card for Fact and Fantasy: Beaded Narratives by Nancy Hooten and Kym Hepworth, 
at Indigo Sky Community Gallery, Savannah, GA

If you're in the area . . . stop by Indigo Sky Community Gallery on Friday, March 16th for the opening reception of Fact and Fantasy: Beaded Narratives by Nancy Hooten and Kym Hepworth (6-9 pm). Jerome Meadows is the Owner and Gallery Director of Indigo Sky Community Gallery and Tania Sammons, curator of the Owens-Thomas House and Decorative Arts at the Telfair Museum of Art, is the guest curator of the exhibit. The show runs from March 16 - April 1, 2012.
Many, many, many thanks to Tania Sammons for making this happen!
and thank you Robin Miller!